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Old 02-04-2007, 03:11 PM
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Moss Bros, '06 Baja 1000 Pics & Clips

I copied & Pasted this Post from TWW. http://www.thewebwheeler.com/forums/...splay.php?f=42



Our new Team shirts! ianodance:




New Stickers.


Here were entering Tech.




Got through Tech with no issues.


Back on the trailer.



Heading out to our beach house.







Don always aranges a beautiful place for us to stay!



Black Race/White Chase!


Sticker Time!


Fortunitly I brought some of these, I had no Idea they painted it.


From here some of us headed out to Sharkys to play pool & have dinner..

I learned this night just because I'm ok at Playing Pool on line dont mean I can shoot worth a damn on a real table.


I left early so I could hang out on the beach a little & look up @ the perfectly Clear sky..

I hung out on this boat for a while..

& I thought about Tex, when I took this Pic.


The truck is starting to look better now, Buut still aint right. http://www.thewebwheeler.com/forums/...umm_smilie.gif


Just add a little fuel to the fire & Wha-laa!



All packed with gear & ready to go.


Heading out to adjust the Aux. lights on the bumper.



I slept in the Garage with Blacko & thought I'd post my view.


Bummer we could'nt be closer to the beach..


Over night while staring @ the Black Bronco, That I'm now calling Blacko I realized most of its stickers are white & my White TWW stickers were going to simply get lost it the abundance of white sticker...
But then I realized I brought a set of the Super Rare yellow TWW stickers & figured they would look good & stand out a bit more so while everyone slept I snuck out to Blanco & replaced the sticker's with the super rare yellow ones..:cheers:
They do stand out a bit more & this way when you see pics of it driving by you'll notice someting yellowish & realize, It a TWW sticker!

Here we see Ken Moss (TWW'ian MB2) placing the sticker.



What a great view.


Game plan map.


Ok so now we move on To Pic time! ianodance:
Thats Don Moss in the Pics.










& with the champs in the Pics.







& now these Following Pics are

Dave told me to go get in the Pic ( Even though I did'nt want to ) I did & I took pics of Dave & Ken taking pics of me.








OK on to the Race & Chase duties..
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Old 02-04-2007, 03:14 PM
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Words from Don Moss

I just got this in a E-mail from Don.
--------------------------------------------
We finished up the 2006 Baja 1000 out in front again!
In addition we had a perfect 5 wins for 5 races,
claimed the Class 3 points championship, and will get
a Toyota Milestone award for finishing all the race
miles of the season.

There were two other finishers in the class, including
Chris Raffo and his Blazer and Ed Griffin in his early
Bronco, making a better than 50% finishing rate for
the class.

We had quite a few minor problems during the race, and
have a ton of stories to tell. I will start putting
those together as I have time over the next few days.
I also have many people to thank for all the help they
provided to make a successful run.


Don
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Old 02-04-2007, 03:23 PM
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Words from Don Moss


Moss Brothers Racing, 2006 Baja 1000

This year’s Baja 1000 was one of the toughest that anyone had seen, and after a handful of problems, we came away with another win! That’s five wins for five races this year.

In addition to the adverse course conditions, there were a record 431 entries that started the race. Both of these could have caused us problems, but in the end they turned out to be a non-issue. Here’s what the course looked like courtesy of the BFG map:

Map Unavailable


The Bronco was completely inspected from one end to the other prior to the race. The front axle was completely new. Dave Grundman welded up a new housing with the high clearance truss that he has designed, and River City Differential set it up with all new internal parts, including alloy axles and CTM u-joints. As always, these performed flawlessly. We went through the Deaver springs and installed the new bushings that they provided. We also went through the shocks and replaced the oil. Ken spent a day and a half welding and pounding out the dents in the beat up old body. He also installed the doors and fender that West Coast Broncos had provided, as well as new Beard window nets. West Coast had also provided us with a couple of new bodies, but we just ran out of time to install one of them. We sprayed on a new coat of black paint and all new decals. The truck looked by far the best it ever has in the 7 years that we have raced it. We also had a new set of wheels from American Racing and a new set of Baja T/A tires from BF Goodrich bolted on. This is how it looked minutes before we headed into the town for the start of the race.




We ended up with 5 entries in the class in the following order. The Griffin early Bronco from Texas, the brand new Endeavor Racing early Bronco, also from Texas, ourselves, Chris Raffo and his Blazer, and the BC Broncos early Bronco. There was supposed to be a brand new Toyota FJ Cruiser driven by a group of professional rock crawler guys, but for whatever reason they never showed.

I started the race with Chris Reilly at about 12:45 in the afternoon. We start right after the Class 9 cars, and I have no idea why. We have been consistently faster than them for many, many races. After starting something like 30 races over the last few years, I was apparently a little anxious and really surprised a few of the spectators on the very first turn, still on the pavement, not a 100 yards from the starting line. We did not hit anything, tested the reverse gear, and took off again. We caught the Endeavor Bronco in the wash maybe a mile from the start. He was wisely following the advice given to him to take it easy in his very first race. We caught the Griffin Bronco in the dirt at the end of Ave Ruiz. They had changed the course slightly in this area, and since we hadn’t pre-run an inch of this course, we followed him for quite a few miles before we had a chance to pass. We immediately started catching and passing the Class 9 cars in this section, as well as slower 5-1600 Baja bugs and stock full size and stock mini trucks. We continued on but noticed the oil temperature of the transmission was skyrocketing. I had recalled the same problem at the Primm race when we used first gear, so I stopped using it. It gradually came back down and stayed there as long as we didn’t first gear. We continued on to our first scheduled stop at Ojos Negros at about race mile 35. Ken and Dan Thunborg got in as Glenn, Rodney, Jake, Robert and Web Wheeler Cam quickly checked over the truck. The Raffo Blazer passed us as we were stopped.



Ken and Dan headed out for the run over through San Felipe. Glenn, Rodney, Jake and Cam headed out to follow them to that side of the course, while Chris, Robert and myself headed back towards Ensenada and then south to catch them at El Crucero, down around race mile 330. I wasn’t able to remember a lot about what Ken and Dan saw on this section, but they did say they caught and passed the Raffo Blazer at about mile 50 in a water crossing. This was one of the first successful tests of the Canadian water proofing that we used numerous times during this race. Later I found out that the BC Broncos entry had broken a shock mount around mile 100, and were only able to limp after that, and pulled out. The Endeavor Bronco had a problem with the frame where the steering box bolts. They pulled out near Checkpoint 3. I have not confirmed this, but I heard that our own Glenn Long and crew assisted them out of this area and back to San Felipe. Nice job guys!

The highway section back out to Ensenada is very slow due to the mountainous terrain and extremely high traffic load during the race. It was also very slow through Ensenada on a typical work day afternoon however it was even worse than usual with the grand opening of a new W** M*rt. Dave and Craig Laws had started out south with the trailer directly from Ensenada headed for Loreto. We kept in touch with them via satellite phone. Cliff Sinclair and Gary Dunn had been at the starting line and headed directly south to El Crucero. We were only able to talk to them with the radio, which meant they had to be pretty close to hear us. We were glad to hear them when we began getting close to El Crucero, knowing then that we hadn’t passed them broken down on the road somewhere in the last 300 miles. While driving down, we had been monitoring the Weatherman on the SCORE operations frequency. There is always something going on here, and we wanted to see if there was any news of our entry or of any others in the class. In between his constant reminders to all that he would not be providing any status information on entries, they handled a couple of emergencies. One involved a wreck on the highway south of San Felipe and involved apparent spectators. There was at least one fatality and the other passengers required extraction from the wreck. The second incident involved his son’s PCI Trophy Truck team chase truck. We passed the second incident on the highway north of El Crucero where the chase truck had apparently gotten to close to the edge of the road and rolled down a 30 foot cliff. They had a doctor there quickly and apparently there were quite a few lacerations, but this was all very sobering information. Baja plays for keeps!

El Crucero is a little spot about 328 miles into the race where the race course gets close to highway 1. Normally there is nothing there except some trash and a burned out car. When you come over the hill during a race, it looks like a city. There are thousands of lights, trucks, trailers and people. We pulled in there and began looking for a place to set up a pit. I was also in radio contact with Jack Covert from the Old Horse racing team who was pitting for two of the early Broncos in our class. I walked up and down the pit area twice and could never find him. The other problem was I could not find an open spot to set up a pit. About this time we started to make radio contact with the Ken and Dan in the Bronco on their way in. We made the decision to quickly look for another spot and headed south. Thanks to the BFG pit books, we found a spot at about race mile 333 or 335 that was accessible from the highway but about a mile in. There were only 3 or 4 other pits set up out there, and we were able to pull right in and set up a few feet from the course. The other people there must have thought we were pretty amazing. They had been sitting there probably all day waiting for their entries, and were still waiting. We pull in with two chase trucks, two guys put on helmets, and the Bronco pulls in 5 minutes later!

Ken and Dan jump out, and Chris and myself strap in. Some gas was added, and I get completely hooked up and set to go. Just then Ken comes up and says one of the rear tires “looks a little low”. We were completely unprepared for that, and guys start going through the chase truck looking for the jack and lug wrench. There was a spare that was easy to get to, but it had to be untied. The first lightweight jack that was easy to get to, had become separated from its handle, and it apparently couldn’t be found in the dark. I watched Ken, still with his helmet on, drag the heavy floor jack out from the bottom of the pile of stuff in the truck. The new tire was bolted on, in what seemed like a very long time. It turns out that floor jack would apparently not release and go down. It was all worked out eventually and we did get on our way, but there are several things that I see I need to do to improve things. I can see now why some of the chase trucks that go by have a COMPLETE floor jack mounted at the very rear of the truck. Actually, we have had so little trouble with the BFG Baja T/A tire, that we never have a chance to practice this. In fact we still don’t know what caused the tire to leak, but suspect a puncture of some kind. It’s not like there is anything to run over in Baja!

Chris and I headed toward the Bay of Los Angeles, or BOLA as it is known by its abbreviation. At the stop, Ken had told me to “stay away from first gear” and that the transmission “slips when you shift from first to second”. About 10 miles later we passed a Pro Truck stuck in the sand. In retrospect, we should have stopped and helped him out, but I made the decision to keep going. We had just spent 15 minutes changing a tire IN OUR PIT, we had an iffy transmission, we were only a 1/3 of the way into the race with the worst part of the course is to come, and we had no idea where the other entries were in our class. Like I said, in retrospect, the other entries were probably already more than a couple hours back. On the other hand, the stuck Pro Truck did get going eventually and passed us later in the race.

It is about midnight as we approach BOLA, and even though it is in the desert, it is November and it is COLD! Last year Don Crosson from the Canadian portion of our team had provided us with some electric vests, but during that race I had never had a chance to try it out. They use them for snowmobiling and other winter sports up there. This time I was prepared and had it on, and it worked perfectly! It was a good thing because that was all I had.

We made our stop at the BFG pit at BOLA, and went on our way. Those guys are always the best, and check the truck over quickly and get the fuel in just as fast. We got a few miles out of BOLA and come across a bunch of lights, and what appears to be a fire in the middle of the course. The road in this section is typically VERY fast, and is why I always schedule myself to drive it! The first and best thing to learn when you race in these races is to slow down when you see activity on or near the course. Remember that that they just had a severe hurricane in this part of Baja, with up to 20 inches of rain in a short amount of time, so there are bound to be some washouts. This was apparently one of them, and it caught the super star Travis Pastrana, teamed with Damen Jeffries in an unlimited Class 1 buggy, by surprise. I am not sure how badly they crashed, but the car caught fire. Here’s a picture of it fully engulfed:



Note that in the picture, the HID lights are still on! By the time we got there, it was just a frame, with a little bit of debris burning in the middle of the course. The guys were not injured seriously, but the spectators just barely got them out of the car before this was taken. OK, so I am fully awake again! We continued on at a pretty good pace, but began catching the dust of another car. At least it wasn’t like two years ago when we did the entire section at 35 mph because the dust was so bad. We eventually ran down and passed several cars in this section, averaging around 50 mph. We also came across a very large and dusty black steer blocking half of the road. Not sure if he was wounded, but he was very much alive and sitting up with his back to us. Chris thanked me for calmly swerving around the beast, and not going off the course into the cactus! Your welcome Chris! We pulled into the BFG pit at Tablon South where Ken and Gary jumped in.

Again I didn’t get a bunch of details from Ken and Gary about the section they did. The first part is horribly boring because it involves about 40 miles of highway where we have to limit our speed to 60 mph. They dive off at San Ignacio and head west toward the El Datil fish camps. I guess there was a little confusion out in this area as the course winds around the small bays and the beach, but for the most part they just motored along. I was riding with Cliff in Ken’s truck, and apparently got quite a bit of sleep. I usually have a hard time sleeping in the chase truck, but I really needed it! I do recall waking up once as several of the bags from the back seat moved to the front seat with me as Cliff slowed for a herd of cows in the road. I also missed the overturned semi on the steep twisty road going down into Santa Rosalia. From here south, there were numerous washouts on the highway. Fortunately the road crews had marked the bad spots consistently and very well for Mexico standards. As the Bronco got further south, the course headed back east and eventually went toward Loreto in a brand new section never raced before. By this time it was daylight. There were many reports of impassable sections of race course in this area by other racers, but Ken and Gary declined an extra pit for fuel or relief before the regular pit at Loreto. They did mention that driving into the rising sun had been brutal as they headed east.

At the BFG pit we waited for maybe 30 minutes for Ken and Gary to arrive. This was the first time we had seen Dave and Craig in 24 hours. The BFG crew graciously provided the waiting crew with Red Bull, as we watched various buggies, with way too tired drivers miss the pit entrance. Ken and Gary pulled in with the Bronco, and Dave and I jumped in. Ken reported no problems whatsoever with the Bronco, other than the slipping transmission. We headed up into the mountains and switchbacks west of Loreto and into the dust of a 5-1600 Baja bug. We also began a series of water crossings that we would typically crawl through out of habit. I began hitting these harder and harder as I tried to catch and pass the bug. The Canadian water proofing was working great, but water began coming over the hood and coming right through the open windshield on to Dave and I. The water was not cold or anything, but it got into the connectors for our intercom, shorting them out. When this happened, you had to either unplug the connectors or turn the volume all the way down to avoid the ear splitting screech it caused. We found that it took about 10 miles to dry out the connectors and get them working again. Fortunately Dave has excellent hand signaling abilities and we motored on. I don’t recall if we passed the bug or not, because we began a series of water crossings in the wash on the back side of the mountain. If we had counted, I would have guessed there were no less than 30 crossings of this same wash. Each was 100 or 200 yards wide made up of round bowling ball sized rocks all jumbled up, with water 6 inches to 2 feet deep. SCORE had painted stripes on a few rocks in a few places to guide you through otherwise it was impossible to tell where you were going. I can’t imagine what it must have been like in the dark picking your way through this stuff. There were various buggies and motorcycles that we passed that had had problems with the water. About 30 miles in from Loreto, we passed the crew cab chase truck for the Ryan Arciero Trophy Truck. They were clearly struggling with the terrain in a fully loaded, nearly stock truck. We passed the Trophy Truck about 10 miles later. I later heard that it took the chase crew 5 hours to get to them, and all they needed was an alternator and a jump start.

After just passing through 30 plus rocky water crossings, Dave and I encountered a little mud puddle at around race mile 830. As we typically do, we look for a way to skirt the edge of these things, since the Bronco is usually very good at picking its way slowly around things. Well, about half way around the “puddle”, the truck bounced a little on a rut, and slide right into this hole that had to have been 4 feet deep! The truck ends up at a 45 degree angle, with the left side water line at the middle of the doors. I had a good 6” of muddy water on my side of the floorboards. The truck was still running, so I shifted it into low range and second gear just to be sure there were good working gears, but it didn’t even budge, with all the wheels spinning. Dave jumps out with the tow strap in hand, just as a local spectator runs around on the road in front of us. It turns out they did have a very capable 4 wheel drive truck, but were concerned with traveling backwards on the course. Once we had stopped moving, it also became obvious that there was a perfectly good trail to the right of the bushes on the right side of the mud hole, but you could not see it from the main road. Several motorcycles and a couple of buggies arrived while we waited to get hooked up, and stopped dead in their tracks once they saw the mud covered 4 wheel drive Bronco in the bottom of the pit. They had to be completely convinced that they were on a good road before proceeding. One Baja bug driver even sent his co-driver out on foot to be sure. The locals were able to pop the Bronco right out of the hole, and $20 later Dave was out of breath and back in the Bronco and we were on our way with a now very brown truck.

At race mile 855 we reached Checkpoint 8, the second to last road crossing. The crew was there to add a little fuel to make sure we made it to the next BFG pit. The truck was confirmed to be muddy but fine, and we continued on our way. Somewhere in this section, we got a little off the main track, and whacked a big cactus. The cactus exploded in a shower of green liquid. With all the rain, these things had soaked up a ton of water; however it had some cucumber sized blooms that ended up rolling around on the hood of the truck. As we continued on, they would of course roll back toward us as we accelerated, and roll forward when we slowed. After they had made several laps around the hood, I decided that I clearly did not want anything cactus related in the cab with me, and slammed on the brakes long enough for them to clear off the hood. We pulled into the Mission Gonzaga BFG pit a little while later and they had us on our way in short order. It turns out those little Red Bull cans will just squeeze under the skirt and the chin guard on my helmet, which sure helped after the long hours.


The scariest moment of the entire week occurred next as we were now racing through a series of silt beds. We could tell that there was some type of vehicle in front us, but we had not caught site of it yet to determine what it was or how close to it we were. We were powering through a medium depth silt hole at probably 20 mph when suddenly the silt clears slightly and a human stands up wearing a motorcycle helmet right in front of the truck! I was able to stomp on the brakes, and with the help of the deep silt, stop the truck before hitting the rider. The rider was in the process of picking up the bike. In the confusion, I don’t know if we tapped the bike or not. As we sat, the rider moved the bike off to the side of the trail. We pulled up and I opened the door and my visor. I asked if the rider was OK. After a quick glance at the bike, the rider gave us a thumbs up, so we were on our way. I am not sure if the rider could hear us when he went down, or if he just did not have time to react, but the safest thing would have been for him to dive off the side of the trail. On the other hand, if he had not been there, we would have surely plowed right over the bike and spent the next 30 minutes untangling it from the bottom of the Bronco, trying to figure how to carry the rider out to the next checkpoint. Just a reminder to all, this IS a dangerous occupation!

As we approached Checkpoint 9 at race mile 943, the crew informed us that Cliff was ready to climb in as co-driver. I radioed back that they needed to provide a driver as well. In the back of my mind, I pictured the 37 mile long section of whoops that we had crawled through in 2002 and 2004, and after all we had been through in the last 180 miles, that was the last thing I needed. Ken apparently figured he was done and was already back in his street clothes, but he was completely suited up by the time we rolled in. Later at the finish Ken told me that just about the entire section was graded road, with only a short section of whoops and of course the mini Summit. Oh well, there was no question I was tired. We added the last of the gas we had scheduled to add, and Ken and Cliff were on their way.

The last road crossing was very crowded, since there was also a small café in the same location, so there were a ton of people all around as we loaded up to head to the finish. We were there for a good 10 or 15 minutes when Ken came on the radio and tells us that they were broken down and needed parts! The track bar, which locates the truck frame in relation to the front axle, had snapped off at the axle. Of course it then swung down and dug into the road as it was bent back underneath the axle. We had a spare track bar, but it was in the F350 chase truck which had not arrived at the road crossing yet. When we called them on the radio, they were parked 10 miles up the road, trying to figure out how to transfer fuel from the auxiliary tank to the main tank. Apparently the check valve I had installed to prevent the auxiliary tank from siphoning had decided to stick shut. We suggested that they get on the road and that we would fuel them from one of the other chase trucks. In the mean time, we determined that the Bronco was 8 to 10 miles out. This took a while because for some reason for this race the BFG GPS files did not contain mileage waypoints. We tried unsuccessfully to locate an ATV that we might be able to borrow and bring the parts out with, when Ken informed us that it was a “graded” road to where they were. Once we had the F350 fueled, confirmed that the parts we needed were actually in the truck, Craig, Gary and I headed out on to the course. The “graded” road was actually not too bad, but had a lot of silty areas that we had to power through or around. I set the odometer, and they turned out to be about 10 miles in. Ken and Cliff had all the old parts off, and the new parts went right in. They had parked right in front of a local rancher’s remote house, and all the family and relatives were crowded around the repair site. The rancher kept a constant dialogue going, giving Craig grief about the “size of his wrench” and various other comments about all the repairs. When we substituted a genuine piece of baling wire for a missing cotter key, he declared the project an Authentic Mexican Repair!

Ken and Cliff jumped in and headed out, while we tried to figure how to get out of there. The BFG books showed an access road down the course a couple of miles, but without a GPS we struggled to find it. We stopped and talked to locals and spectators, and they all waved us in the general direction of south. After locking in the hubs and diving into a very questionable arroyo crossing that just did not look good in an overloaded chase truck, we eventually got on a trail headed 10 more miles out to the highway. A motorcycle passed us on the way out, and made it all the way out to the highway where Dave and Dan were waiting for us. There he turned around and headed back out to find the course. Later in La Paz, we heard this same rider describing following “someone’s” dust for several miles and then realizing he was not really on the course!

The chase caravan headed on toward La Paz, but oddly we did not hear any radio transmissions from the Bronco. It is usually all line of site radio accessible in this area, but they did have a satellite phone in the Bronco if they really did need help, so we continued on. The Moss Brothers Racing Bronco rolled into La Paz right on schedule, with a time of 27 hours, 3 minutes and 4 seconds. It turned out that the both of the alternator belts had been tossed off somewhere in the last 100 miles or so, and Ken and Cliff had decided to cut all the electrical loads and keep driving. Both batteries were down to about 10 volts when they finished, so even if they had been transmitting on the radio, we could not hear them.

We ended up finishing 86th overall (bikes included) out of a record 431 entries. The Raffo Blazer finished about 11 hours later, and the Griffin Bronco finished another 3 hours after that. We are anxious to hear their stories when we catch up with them. The word that we had was that the Raffo Blazer had to replace a broken spindle, and that the Griffin Bronco had rolled over. Our crew rooted for all the teams in our class the entire race, and we ended up with a 60% finishing rate for the class, better than the overall finishing rate of 50 something percent.

From the finish, we moved on to the Aqua Marina RV Park, where we have stayed the last two times in La Paz. Maria Luisa asked me if we would be partying that night when we checked in. I told her “Yes, but it will be a VERY brief party, these guys are tired!”

The next day, Sal Fish had told us the awards would be on the Melacon downtown, starting at 10:00. We were there right on time, brought the muddy Bronco with us and parked it right in front. We staked out some chairs in the shade, since it was 95+. We watched the local school girls do some of their traditional dances, and a local trumpet band do their thing. We also watched Sal do a very low speed jump off a 2 foot concrete ledge in a rented Expedition. At 1 pm, Charley got on the microphone and informed the crowd that the awards would be getting started “around 2 pm”. Sorry to say, we had had enough, collected up the Bronco, loaded up, checked out, and fueled the trucks by 2 pm and headed North. We stayed on the beach at Olivia’s that night, south of Mulege, and made it all the way back to the house in Ensenada Sunday night. We paid $27 for $20 lobster dinners in La Bufadora, got a good night sleep, and were back in California Monday morning. I think everyone made it home that night or at least very early Tuesday morning.

I just wanted to thank everyone involved; we got some work out each and everyone that went along. I hope we provided you with some good times, and at least a WIN for the effort! Thanks to Krista Reilly for putting us up in El Cajon on the way down and setting us up with breakfast. Thanks to Robert McCanne for setting us up with team shirts, complete with a professionally done artists rendering of the Bronco on the back. Thanks to River City Differential, Deaver Suspension, West Coast Broncos, Finishline Racing Equipment, King Shocks, American Racing Wheels, BF Goodrich, Sunoco Race Fuel, Instant Mexico Insurance, Bronco Diver Magazine, The Web Wheeler, Old Horse Racing, Beard Seats, and Unique Metal Products. Thanks to Carlos in Ensenada for setting us up with a great house, and Richard and Maria Luisa in La Paz for the run of the RV Park and apartments. Check out some great pictures of at least the northern portion of the course on www.thewebwheeler.com. I am sure there will be some pictures trickling in from the finish as well.

Finally, I wanted to dedicate this race to the Crosson family in Canada. Don has brought himself, his family and friends to this race for the last two years. The have all been rock solid, fabulous people. We have learned a lot from them that has improved the Bronco and helped bring it to the finish line each time. I hope that we have shown them a few things as well. Don was not able to attend this year, due to an illness in the family. I can only hope that all is going well with them, and that our thoughts were of them during the entire race. We all missed you. This one’s for you guys.

Don Moss
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Old 02-04-2007, 03:34 PM
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From Chris Anderson @ americanracing.com Via E-Mail.


Don’
Congratulations it looks like you were the first guy to finish the 1000 on American Racing wheels so that makes you the winner of our ATX Xpert Award which is good for $4000 worth of American Racing Wheels. We plan on announcing the winners at the Score Banquet and just wanted to make sure that you are there. Would also like to get a finish line picture showing the wheels and sticker so we can put it up on screen.
Thanks
Chris
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Old 02-04-2007, 03:37 PM
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Old 02-04-2007, 06:47 PM
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I've been trying all day again to upload a Video clip of our 1st Pit Stop but cant seem to up load it anywhere.
its only 11.8mb's & under 2 minutes.

Oh well ....



This was the last I saw of the Moss Bronco as it drove past me just south of San felipe.
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Old 02-14-2007, 11:56 AM
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awsome pics!!!!!!!
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Old 02-14-2007, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RIGSBY/GALLESRACING View Post
awsome pics!!!!!!!
Thanks I try...

I've taking lots of Pics of the teams efforts for a little over a year now & if you wanna see more of the Pics follow this link.

http://www.thewebwheeler.com/forums/...splay.php?f=42

I just did'nt feel right stealing all the Pics from my other site to place them here...
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